Philosophy as the Art of Self-Initiation

Providing man with the means of cleansing and perfecting his nature, Philosophy as the art of self-initiation has a long-standing tradition, beginning in Greek coastal Ionia in 7th century BCE.As a form of meditation (Gr: Διαλογισμός), it has assisted man in his quest to answer fundamental questions by looking inwards for answers, while offering a chance to escape fate through personal progress. This becomes possible through a better understanding of our current situation and by connecting or reconnecting with our higher self.

With the use of dialectics, logic, mythological themes, and through the application of methodical questioning (Socratic method), philosophy has become the path of the middle way in the West. The known Delphic maxims “know thyself” and “do nothing in excess” both serve as a reminder to man of his mortality as well as his divine nature. When properly understood and applied in everyday life, they help the seeker of truth square his passions, divest his self of all dogma, and live a virtuous life in harmony with himself, deity, and his environment.  Continue reading “Philosophy as the Art of Self-Initiation”

In Search of Light: A Journey Through the Mysteries of the Great Gods

One of the things that fascinate me about the mystery traditions (ancient and modern) is the inherent, tremendous potentiality they have to light a spark of the divine within humanity and ultimately assist the initiate to unite the microcosm of the individual soul with the macrocosm of the higher self. In a few words, to achieve deeper self-knowledge and to unite with the cosmos and deity in accordance with the unique understanding we have of the latter. In order to do that, a medium is required: an element of connection, so to speak, and not just an idea, but an actual existent reality through which the initiate can progress his/her soul through and achieve that union of the microcosm with the macrocosm described above. Continue reading “In Search of Light: A Journey Through the Mysteries of the Great Gods”

Myth, Catharsis, and The Riddle of The Sphinx

A macroscopic view of myth (Gr: Μύθος) as logos (usually translated as “word”) reveals important associations, insights, and interpretations, all which deserve our attention and can assist us in our exploration of the human soul and its journey towards freedom. During the 9th – 8th century BC, Homer (in his poems the Iliad and the Odyssey) equates myth with speech and conversation, but also with advice, opinion, and promise. During classical times (5th and 4th century BC), myth continues to be treated as a story, as evident by the dramatic works of Sophocles and Euripides.

In the context of philosophy, myth becomes a powerful pedagogical and initiatory device, especially as it appears in the dialogues of Plato. In works such as Phaedo and Phaedrus, the philosopher employs myths to structure his arguments in order to equate knowledge with memory – not simply as remembrance, but also as a recollection from a previous incarnation. Continue reading “Myth, Catharsis, and The Riddle of The Sphinx”