Divining in the Dark: The Runes as a Guide through Disruption

“It is my firm conviction that the Runes, as adapted here for the contemporary Rune caster, are not meant to be used for divination or fortune telling,” writes Ralph H. Blum. “The disposition of the future is in God’s hands, not ours. Rather, the Runes are a tool for assisting us to guide our lives in the present.

The synchronistic wallops I’ve been receiving by pulling runes from day one has been impressive. They are in a rhythm with my daily trials in a way that goes beyond explanation. It began at the start of this year as an added component of a set of daily rituals I dedicated myself too. Continue reading “Divining in the Dark: The Runes as a Guide through Disruption”

Body Language, Ritual, And Self-Development

In medieval Europe, a man about to be made into a vassal (generally a knight) of a feudal lord went through a special rite. It will seem familiar to you. He knelt on the floor and placed his hands together, with the fingertips pointing at his lord, who would then clasp his own hands around them. At this point in history, as with the pre-Christian tribes of Europe, Christians prayed with their arms open, and up, in a kind of wide V-shape — which reminded the latter group of Christ on the cross. It was only later that, influenced by the rite of making a vassal, Christians adopted the posture of kneeling and placing the hands together when praying.
Continue reading “Body Language, Ritual, And Self-Development”

Spirituality And Ritual Violence: An Explanation

“Violence,” says Rene Girard, “is the heart and secret soul of the sacred.” This is perhaps a shocking statement, and one that flies in the face of the modern tendency to sugar coat certain religions, and to equate spirituality with peace, quiet, and love of humanity.

Girard makes the above statement in his Violence and The Sacred, in which he explores the history of human sacrifice, in particular, as a social phenomenon that binds the community together, and that is both “a sacred obligation” and “a sort of criminal activity.” Although often being treated as an honored guest, or even as a son, during the period leading up to his murder, it is the outsider (often a captive from an enemy tribe) that is usually sacrificed.

Here, in contrast, we will look at violence, the sacred, and the insider, i.e., the member of the tribe. In other words, we will explore violence as an aspect of initiation, especially into manhood or into full membership of the cult or fraternity. Continue reading “Spirituality And Ritual Violence: An Explanation”